Ordinary People


We often reflect on the heroes of black history with enormous pride, reverence, and idealization.

And to be fair, spend a few moments calling to mind their achievements, and it’s very easy to assign to them superhuman virtues and characteristics.

However, without any deliberate effort on our part, maybe we create this distance between ourselves and our heroes raising them up on an ever-growing pedestal founded on attributes we sometimes don’t believe we possess. And maybe this is often enough to separate us from any real sense that we can build on their legacy in our time.

Like who are we to have a dream. (We barely get enough sleep!) We’re too ordinary.

“The important work of moving the world forward doesn’t wait to be done by perfect men.”

– Mary Ann Evans

This may surprise some, but like us, our heroes were not superwomen/men.

They were ordinary people, who shared many of our ordinary qualities, personal flaws and fears; and just maybe would have preferred to have led a less visible and much simpler life. But they offer proof that even ordinary people can do extraordinary things; and that extraordinary isn’t always the impressive, well-publicized acts. (These rarely shape and change the world.) It’s most commonly the persistent, un-televised, non-history-making individual acts that overtime chip away at the status quo and prevailing consciousness, and redirect the course of the world.

“If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.”

– Martin Luther King Jr

This month in honor of our heroes, oneKIN highlights current figures that demonstrate our 3 C’s in how they use their platforms to shape culture, build community, and advance commerce in unique ways. In so doing, they remind us of our opportunity to build on our heroes’ legacies in our time.

#Commerce #Community #Culture #BlackHistory

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